Coaching Supervision

What is Coaching Supervision?

One to one Supervision - this is where you have quality time with your supervisor, Julia Menaul, that is solely for you and your client work whether as an independent coach or an internal coach. Frequency and timing can be contracted for, depending on individual needs and budget.

Duo Supervision - this is a unique way for coaches who have limited budgetary resources for supervision. This is an opportunity to share a 90 minute session in supervision equally, to work on own clients but also learn from the other coach. Frequency and fees to be negotiated.

Group Supervision - Internal group supervision for organisations with a frequency to suit budget and coaching pool needs. Julia Menaul also runs an independent coaching supervision group in Manchester. (See more information below.)

Why do coaches need supervision?

In a crowded coaching market, regular supervision helps a coach stand out. It shows commitment to regularly updating your skills (long after qualification) by reflecting on you and your practise with an experienced coach and supervisor. It ensures you are operating safely within the current ethical guidelines of the major coaching bodies. This shows to clients that they are safe with you and you with them. And if the worst should happen you have back up and support.

The Global Code of Ethics of the AC and EMCC says about On-going supervision: 

4.3 To support their learning and on-going professional development, members will engage in regular reflective practice.
4.4 Members will engage in supervision with a suitably qualified supervisor or peer supervision group with a level of frequency that is appropriate to their coaching or mentoring practice, the requirements of their professional body and the level of their accreditation.
4.5 Members need to ensure that any other existing relationship with the supervisor does not interfere with the quality of the supervision provided.
4.6 Members will discuss any ethical dilemmas and potential, or actual, breaches of this code with their supervisor or peer supervision group for support/guidance.

 

What do you talk about in supervision?

The focus is very much driven by the coach (supervisee) and is different depending on where the coach is in their journey. The table below shows that journey in supervision. 

 Hawkins and Smith 2006

Topics can be about how to handle tricky coachees or their situations, dealing with contracting issues, the coaches own habitual patterns of behaviour, business development, accreditation, emotional well being, exploring “hot buttons”, handling commissioning clients, overlapping boundaries, being an internal coach etc. 

One to One and Duo Supervision

Julia can discuss with you how much supervision is most appropriate depending on your level of budget and time. Virtual and/or phone supervision is very cost effective. An initial commitment to 3 hours of supervision initially will help you decide if the fit is right. After that, contracting can work with your own specific and personal needs based on your level of work and other factors such as future accreditations or tenders that may require a formal statement of supervisor arrangements. A minimum recommendation would be once a quarter but ideally once every 4-6 weeks via phone, Zoom (online platform) or face to face in Stafford. Larger organisational groups of one to one work can be conducted at employers’ premises). 

Group Supervision

Julia runs a supervision group once a quarter in Manchester which is also an ideal way of meeting supervision needs while sharing and networking with other like-minded coaches. Check out upcoming and past events here: Spark Events

Challenges of Internal Coaching

Internal coaches are in a unique position in that they may know the people they are coaching and all the related stakeholders around their coachee. They understand the culture too. Problems that can arise because of this are:

  • Tendency for more day to day work-based issues brought to coaching
  • Having no support after initial coach training for any difficulties or on-going increased coaching capability – liable to form bad habits quickly.
  • Feeling forced into being mentors or coaching on areas that should be line manager responsibility
  • Most ethical issues are on levels of confidentiality and role conflict
  • More problems with boundaries between counselling and coaching e.g. stressed employees displaying behaviours that appear “normal” to the coach as “it’s what happens around here and/to me too”.
  • Coachees not as engaged/cancel more often because coaching seen as “free” especially if there is poor organisational buy in that allows day job to dominate.
  • Coaches showing relief at cancellations as they have their own day job to juggle. This is transmitted to coachees and collusion can ensue.
  • Anxiety around three-way contracting because of dual relationships & prior knowledge.
  • Low numbers of coaching clients per coach can mean supervision more focused on skills development or CPD. Plus lack of confidence or feeling deskilled because of low “flying hours”.
  • Coaches bringing personal frustration with organisation to supervision. Supervisors have to balance the need to vent, with surfacing any parallel process actually coming from coachees. 

However, one of the benefits of internal supervision is that data can often be harvested within a group supervision session that protects confidentiality but allows the organisation to pick up overall themes that are emerging from numerous coaching conversations around the organisation. Without a group outlet of some sort this would not happen and important information may be lost. Many of the above could lead to improvements in the overall coaching process and systems.

Julia has over a decade’s worth of experience of running supervision groups within the public and private sectors. Her clients have included; Bury Council, Northwest and Northeast England NHS Leadership Academy, Clatterbridge Cancer Care, Pennine Care NHS Trust, NOMS (Prison Service), UK Parliament, Carter Corson Business Psychologists (Wilmslow), Boo Consulting (Bolton), Staffordshire County Council, Sanctuary Housing (Worcester).

Julia can discuss with you how much supervision is most appropriate depending on your level of budget and time. Skype and phone supervision is very cost effective. An initial commitment to 3 hours of supervision initially will help you decide if the fit is right. After that, contracting can work with your own specific and personal needs based on your level of work and other factors such as future accreditations or tenders that may require a formal statement of supervisor arrangements. A minimum would be once a quarter but ideally once every 4-6 weeks.

Manchester Group Coaching

A Group Coaching Supervision session in Manchester

Julia runs a supervision group once a quarter in Manchester which is also an ideal way of meeting supervision needs while sharing and networking with other like-minded coaches. Check out upcoming and past events here: Spark Events.

Why choose Julia as your supervisor?

  • A learning and development professional with an in depth knowledge of helping people to learn and change.
  • A coach and supervisor with a psychology background that helps with the reading of relationships and/organisational systems.
  • A coach with a corporate background who understands the politics, complexity and ambiguity of organisational life.
  • A coach with a pragmatic approach to coaching grounded in real life experiences who works alongside her coaches in equal partnership.
  • Someone with the highest levels of ethical and professional standards so that supervisees get the ultimate in sensitive support whilst being challenged and stretched to attain mastery as a coach.
  • Someone who has had many years of supervision and coaching herself and is a lifelong learner; being in touch with developments in the field of coaching and with current coaching training. 

Next steps

Make contact by email or on 01785 252112 for a no obligation exploratory discussion on your needs and goals.

Testimonials

I can honestly say she has transformed my coaching relationships and has stretched me, challenged me and ultimately supported me to be a more effective coach. She has also helped me believe in myself and my abilities. Jayne Harrison, Executive Coach, Facilitator & Career Coach Peak Consulting

Coaching and Training Accreditations

Spark Coaching Accreditations